2

One Week To Go, and I Need To Talk About It

Buckle up, buttercups, because this is gonna be a long one.  There’s only one week left until classes start, and I’m a big jittery fluffy ball of nerves, anxiety and excitement… Which for me translates to writing ALL the words.

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On Monday, I found myself back on campus, trying again to iron out the details that still hadn’t been wrapped up. I dipped out of work early, in the hopes that I would be able to knock everything out in one visit:

1. Find Out How This is All Getting Paid For
So of course, I started with the Financial Aid office and, as expected, there’s about a million people waiting ahead of me. (Guess I’m not the only student who is still fighting for their aid the week before classes.) Finally I get called back by my man, Fernando! Finally got to meet him in person, which was pretty cool.

So here’s what’s up:

The Good: I was awarded a Pell Grant, a South Carolina Needs-Based Grant, and a South Carolina Lottery Tuition Assistance Scholarship. All total, it’s enough to cover my entire Fall and Spring tuition, with a little leftover to cover a portion of my Summer tuition. Hooray! So my Fall classes are officially paid-in-full now, and there’s no risk of me missing the payment deadline or losing my seat in each section.

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The Bad: I’m on my own for books, supplies, and whatever the remaining balance for my Summer semester tuition ends up being. Of course, I’ve been telling them from Day 1, back in April, that I figured that would be the case and that I would be needing to do a small student loan to make up the difference.

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The Ugly: Despite all of my howling into the wind to let them know that I was going to need a loan, nobody in Financial Aid ever actually initiated the process or even had me fill out a loan application form. So there I was, sitting in Fernando’s office, a week before classes start and I have zero dollars for books (which this semester alone, for my three classes, are running me a cool $500 bucks) and no loan application even on file, much less processed. Neither of us were pleased.

He had me complete the form and told me he would get it processed that night. However, I saw the two very large stacks of loan paperwork he added my stuff to. And I’m fucking nervous as hell, ya’ll. I’ve been checking my WebAdvisor account online every other hour, but still nothing is posted about a loan award amount.

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2. Get My Student ID Corrected and Reprinted
This was probably the easiest part of my visit to the campus that day, thankfully. I had been trying to call the Student Records office all day Monday to see if their ID card printer was fixed yet, but I never could get anybody on the phone, which was giving me mad anxiety.

Since that office is just across the hall from Financial Aid, I decided to take my chances. They were pretty swamped too with kids doing last-minute registration for Fall, so I did have a short wait. Nothing too bad, though. The girl was super sweet and helpful, and got me in and out of there pretty quickly, with a newly corrected ID in-hand. The only kinda crappy part was that she had to retake my photo, which I was totally unprepared for, but whatever. (No, ya’ll don’t get to see the new one. #sorrynotsorry )

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3. Visit The Bookstore and Buy All My Books for the Semester
Yeeeeaaahhh. Well, as we already know from the Financial Aid visit, no books were acquired. But since the bookstore is located in the same building as my last stop of the day, and I was super early anyhow, I decided I would pop in and just to talk to somebody to verify that the printed materials that I had brought with me were indeed what I would need to get all my books once the money magically appears.

Well, quite unexpectedly for this awkward, shy, eye-contact-dodging, introverted lady, the next thing I know I’m chilling there in the bookstore with three other students (two were work study there and one was just hanging out), talking about Game of Thrones and random fantasy fiction novels, and letting them give me pointers on a couple of my classes and professors. So that was a pleasant surprise!

They also clarified for me that that out of three particular books on the list for my Western Civilizations class, I only need to choose and buy one of them. The professor makes you do a big report on which ever one you pick, and I guess it’s a huge part of your grade. And since I prefer to read on my Kindle anyhow, when I got home that night I went ahead and purchased my choice via Amazon so that I can get a headstart on reading.

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4. Meet with the Guy from Student Support Services
This is the meeting that I told ya’ll about last time, that I got stood up for. We finally rescheduled, and were to meet up at 4:30pm that afternoon. Well, even with all of my other business and socializing around the campus, I still found myself parked on a couch in the Student Lounge (where is his office is located) nearly an hour ahead of schedule. And he was nowhere to be found, so it’s not even like we could just go ahead and meet early.

So I spent that hour just messing around on my phone and lowkey eavesdropping on folks around me. A few people were playing pingpong and talking about school and their career goals, so that was interesting. But then. Ugh. But THEN. A couple of dudes came in and sat somewhere behind me, laughing and watching some bullshit on one of their phones with the volume all the way up.

(SIDE RANT TIME! Seriously, when the holy fuck did it become acceptable to be in public listening to/watching stuff on a personal device without headphones? Over the last year or so, it’s become pretty much my #1 pet peeve in life. It drives me absolutely insane, and I see that shit happening everywhere. People either listening to music or watching stuff on their phones, no headphones, just speakers on blast for everybody around them to just fucking deal with. It’s seriously like nails on a goddamn chalkboard to me, ya’ll.)

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The guy, Jamie, showed up right on time, 4:30pm on the dot. We had a really productive meeting! He explained the program to me, and basically because neither of my parents ever obtained a 4-year college degree, I automatically qualify. Apparently first-generation Bachelors students are considered “at risk” and have a much higher rate of failing to succeed in academia because they don’t have a support system at home that really understands what it’s all about and how hard it can be, or how to help their kids succeed. Which I totally understand now, honestly. I can’t help but wonder now if I had gotten hooked up with a program like this during my first college attempt nearly 20 years ago, would I have been more successful? Maybe so.

The Student Support Services (SSS) program basically creates a support system for those at-risk students. They stay on your ass and make sure you keep your GPA up, and require you to spend a minimum of 12 hours each semester in either the library or the tutoring centers. You’re also required to meet with the SSS counselor (Jamie) at least twice a semester, and attend at least 4 workshops per semester regarding study skills, time management, etc. The reward for meeting all of the requirements? Every other semester, you qualify for a government stipend grant that could range between $500 and $1,500 bucks (based on your financial need).

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Not gonna lie to ya’ll, that stipend is the entire reason I signed up. I mean, that’s free book money, yo. And, I mean, let’s be real… I’m actually pretty lazy and undisciplined most of the time. I’m totally getting better about it as I get older, but the struggle is still very real. So I figure the studying, counseling, and workshop requirements can only help me succeed, right?

Of my three classes this semester, two are online and one is on-campus: My English 101 meets every Wednesday at 5:30pm. I get off work at 4:00pm, and my original plan was to go home, have 30-45 minutes to change clothes and eat something, then head to class. But now what I’m thinking is that I’ll just head straight to campus and grab food on the way, so that I can get in 45 mins to an hour in either the library or the tutoring centers each week. Should knock that particular requirement out pretty easily!

Speaking of the tutoring centers, Jamie did walk me over to the building next door where the centers are located and introduced me to the lady who runs them, who actually gave me a lot of good information. Best Part: I found out that they can help me study for retaking my placement test for Algebra, and ensure that the things that I’m learning with them are the things that will actually be on the damn test! (Don’t get me wrong, I still love Khan Academy, but it’s so incredibly comprehensive that it’s taking forever to complete, and I have been finding myself wondering how much of it is more than I really need to know at this point.) And the hours that I spend working on that (which I plan to start doing ASAP) will count towards the requirement for SSS. So that is super exciting!

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So that was my afternoon at campus on Monday! And today, Wednesday, I found myself back over there again. Part of the paperwork I have to turn-in for the SSS program includes a page that has to be completed and signed by a Financial Aid counselor. And since it’s been 48 hours, and classes now start one week from today, I figured that I may as well check-in with my man Fernando about that loan application.

So after leaving work early, getting caught in a thunderstorm that was still raging when I got to the campus, wading through puddles and soaking my work shoes all the way to my feetsies, I finally made it there.  And.  Well.  If I had thought that the crowd waiting to see Financial Aid on Monday was bad…

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That’s just what I could downlow snap pics of from where I was sitting.  There was another area behind me with probably 7-8 more people.   (Including somebody who brought their toddler, which of course randomly started screaming it’s head off at one point, so to shut it up what does the mother do?  Pulls out her phone and turns on some super whiny high-pitched children’s show.  Without headphones.  On blast.  In this super crowded waiting area.  I seriously can’t escape this shit, ya’ll.)

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Finally an hour later, Fernando finally calls me back to his office.  Guess what?  Nope, no money.  My loan is still pending.  Sigh.  But alas, I was still able to get a couple of things accomplished.  He filled out the paperwork that I need to turn in for the SSS program, and he also showed me some stuff I can go ahead and complete at studentloans.gov tonight which keep the process from getting delayed an additional 24-48 hours once the loans get approved.  Basically it’s just required financial counseling that normally they have you do after the approval comes in, but he showed me what to do so I can go ahead and finish it up now and get it out of the way.  Of course, I’m totally going to work on that as soon as I’m finished writing this stupid long blog post.  You know, because #priorities .

So to wrap this up, I’ve basically come to the decision that if my money isn’t there by Tuesday @ 3:00pm, I’m just going to put my books on a credit card, and then once the loan money comes in I’ll use it to pay the bill.  I’m far too Type-A to mentally handle putting it off any longer, and I certainly don’t want to try and rush to do it between work and the start of my first class on Wednesday.  And I absolutely refuse to be that person who shows up the first day unprepared and without her books, regardless if the reason is completely valid.  Not.  Fucking.  Happening.

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3

Minor Problems and Frustrations

So I know it’s been a couple of weeks since my last post.  Sorry about that!  But really, with classes starting in two weeks, you probably should just get used to it.

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It’s not that nothing’s been happening.  It has.  Just small-ish things that really don’t deserve their own post at this point.  But I thought I’d check in all the same, and write a bit of a hodge-podge post to summarize those things:

First Generation Student Program / Student ID Problems
Something I forgot to mention in my last post about the orientation I attended was that I briefly met the gentleman who is in charge of Career and Transfer Services.  In the very brief handful of minutes he was given to talk to our group, he mentioned that one of the things he administers is a program for First-Generation college students, to encourage and support them in successfully obtaining a 4-year college degree.  What got my attention is that if you sign up for the program and continue to meet all of the requirements (which basically means keeping your GPA up and utilizing the Tutoring Centers), you actually get a cash stipend every other semester to apply towards books or whatever.  And ya’ll know I’m all about dat free money, yo.

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Neither of my parents have degrees, so later that weekend I emailed him to see if I would qualify, even at my advanced age.  He said there’s no age limit on the program, and we arranged to meet at 4:30pm on last Wednesday to discuss it further and get me signed up.

Well, to make a long story short:  He stood me up.  His office door was wide open when I arrived, so I thought surely he’d be back soon.  But I waited until 5:05pm before I gave up, choosing to head across campus to try and accomplish another errand so that it wasn’t a completely wasted afternoon…

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Shortly after I got my Student ID Card a month or so ago, I noticed that there’s an extra digit just chillin’ in the middle of my student identification number.  It’s very obviously a typo and an easy one to make, so I wasn’t too fussed over it.  Just figured I’d get it fixed before the semester started at some point.  So since Old Boy never showed, I decided I’d save the day myself by heading over to Student Records to get that corrected.

Yeah, no.  Wrong.  I arrived at the Student Records office only to be told that their printer was down, and to check back net week (I haven’t).  So that was a bummer, and my trip to the campus really was a complete waste of time that day.

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When I got home I emailed the guy and politely called him out for blowing me off.  He was very apologetic, and we’ve been going back and forth regarding rescheduling, trying to nail down a day & time that works for both of us.  Still nothing confirmed, though.  I’ll let ya’ll know how it all works out!

Major Concerns
I kinda let the whole decision about my major slide away for the time-being, figuring it wouldn’t kill me to actually complete a semester or three or core curriculum classes before really stressing about it.

Yeah.  That didn’t last.

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Aaaaaand so I’m right back in that place again.  (Thanks, Anxiety!)  Today my thoughts were along the lines of:

Fuck it!  Why don’t I just major in something I’ll actually enjoy learning about, even if the career prospects for it are absolute garbage?!  Like Anthropology!  (Yes, I’m still stuck on the Anthropology thing… That shit looks absolutely fascinating to me, even if it is utterly useless!)  Or Creative Writing!  Or Psychology!  Or whatever!

And in addition to that, why don’t I just minor in Hospitality and Tourism Management, and treat that as my fall back!  (Because really, the more and more I look at the Major program requirements, the more I just want to curl up and sob like a little bitch.)  But on the other hand, do employers really give any flavors of fucks about your minor, or just your major?  Plus aren’t the two supposed to be somewhat related, or at least complimentary?  Does any of this shit even matter at all?

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Financial Aid
So while we’re talking about the fucking awesome choices I’m not making regarding this extremely important investment in my future, let’s talk about the money I’m gonna spend on it!  Or not spend, at least for now.  I think.  Things finally happened with my Financial Aid.  Sorta.  Confusing things that need clarification, so I’m not prepared to go into detail quite yet.  But for now I’ll just say there’s money on the way, I just need to have a chat with my boy Fernando to clarify the amounts, disbursement intervals, etc.  Hopefully I’ll have more details the next time.  So at least that’s exciting stuff though, right?!

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0

A Dedicated Study Space

So I’ve been keeping mum here on a little project that I’ve been researching and planning, and it’s actually been incredibly difficult not to mention it.

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I started working on this project way back in April, and so I’m super excited to finally get to write about it and share with all of you today!

See, I have this spare bedroom in my apartment that has been woefully underutilized ever since 2012 or so, when my last (and final) roommate moved out.  Once she left, I set it up as a guest bedroom.  But the thing is that I don’t really get visitors or entertain much overnight company, and for the last 5 years it’s never once been used for that intended purpose.  As such, it progressively became more of a catch-all storage room than anything else.

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God damn Gordon, the room wasn’t that bad.  Just cluttered with junk and full of disorganized nonsense!

Now you all know that I’ve been working on doing an independent study to get myself up to speed in Algebra, which I’ve mostly been doing from my recliner in the living room.  Which, sure, is super comfy and all that, but definitely has it’s drawbacks.  Between trying to balance my laptop on one knee and my notebook on the other, gently fighting off three cats who don’t understand why Mama isn’t letting them come snuggle up in our favorite chair like they’re used to, and getting a little too comfortable and dozing off while I’m trying to work done, it’s often a less-than ideal situation.  Not to mention that it’s so easy to get distracted in the living room and slip into my leisurely habits.

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However, I’ve often read that studying, like sleep, can be benefited by having a space dedicated only to that one activity and nothing else.  So that when you enter that space, in time your brain learns to respond accordingly and enters into a mode of “Woo!  Time to study!  Let’s get our learn on, motherfucker!”  Which honestly sounded like a pretty great idea to me.

So.  That’s what I did.  I turned that bedroom into an actual usable space which I think will really serve me well when the semester begins next month, and all the years following while I work towards my degree.  Over the last couple months I’ve been organizing and selling off stuff that was in the guest room, as well as slowly purchasing and accumulating Phase 1 of the basic furniture for a home office.  Yesterday my dad and grandpa spend the day here assembling it all for me, and ya’ll, I seriously could not be more pleased with the results.  Time to “move that bus!”

BEFORE:

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AFTER:

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The above photos were taken in the afternoon, just as we finished getting everything into place.  Here’s one more, which I took  late last night after I had settled in a bit more:

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As I mentioned earlier, this is all just Phase 1.  I already have Phases 2 & 3 planned out, and will be adding things like more shelving, end tables on either side of the sofa, wall decor, and some fun lighting (fairy lights, etc).  But all of that costs money, so I am tackling it all in phases, and most important was to get the basics moved in and set up first, and then I’ll slowly add in the other things to finish the office up.

But even in it’s current state, I am just tickled pink by my new study space!

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2

I Just Wanna Make Pretty Shit

So I’ve been rolling yet another potential degree/career path around in my head for a while now. I figured that since I have yet to completely rule it out, maybe it’s time to give it a little bit of examination here at Late for Class.  Sound good?

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Sweet, let’s do this.

So waaaaay back during my first attempt at college all those many years ago, sometime between the Jurassic and Cretaceous periods while dinosaurs still roamed the Earth, I began dabbling in Graphic Design. I primarily did so in the capacity of creating simple posters and playbills for the Theatre department’s stage productions. Turned out I was relatively decent at it, and really enjoyed the process. I even won a little departmental award for one of my posters, and that was super exciting.

Around this time I also began teaching myself basic HTML and goofing around with building basic late 1990s era Geocities-style websites (with an intense focus on making them look as little like basic Geocities style websites as possible). While I wouldn’t say that I ever excelled at it, I did pretty okay for a 17-year-old kid with zero experience or education in this area, particularly during a time when the internet was still a relatively new phenomenon to the average person. Most importantly, I had a lot of fun with it.

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Afterwards, while I more or less dropped the web design ambitions, I did continue to play around with Graphic Design as a hobby. I created lots of things for various online communities that I participated in over the years and always received loads of praise for my creations. But now it’s been several years now since I’ve done it just for fun, as I haven’t had home access to any design programs more advanced than MS Paint.

Occasionally I’ve been able to put my under-developed talent in this area to work at some of my jobs, which has always resulted in comments from managers and colleagues such as, “You should be doing this for a living, why didn’t you go to school for this?” To which my default answer was usually, “If I ever get the chance to go back, I most likely will.”

And now here we are.

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The Pennsylvania State University offers a completely online Bachelor’s of Design in Digital Multimedia Design. If I were to go the Graphic Design route, I pretty strongly suspect that this would be the degree for me. It’s marketed as “Three colleges, one program.” Unlike a traditional Graphic Design program curriculum, this one interdisciplinary. Meaning in addition to Visuals Arts and Design, it also incorporates coursework from the Communications and Information Technology schools.

To quote the website:

“What You Can Do with a Penn State Education in Digital Multimedia Design? As a graduate of the program, you can use your skills to create, execute, and evaluate communication strategies — making you a valuable asset for businesses, corporations, government, and nonprofit organizations. Career options may include working as a digital designer in brand, motion, and user experience, or as a web developer, art director, public relations specialist, advertising manager, or media relations professional.”

So basically it’s Graphic Design, Public Relations/Advertising, and Web Design all rolled into one degree.

Which sounds fucking PERFECT for me.

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…At least in theory. As usual: Concerns! I has them!

  1. WTF is a “Bachelor of Design?” Yes, I know there are more types of bachelor’s degrees out there other than just BA or BS. But for real, though… Is it just me, or does this one just sound like make-believe bullshit? And will a prospective employer feel the same, and not take it seriously? (Though I would hope the fact that it’s from a great school like Penn State would counter some of that.)
  2. Is an interdisciplinary degree really such a good choice? I mean, on the surface it’s like “Sweet, I can be educated in lots of things that I enjoy and am good at, which will hopefully open more professional doors for me!” But in reality, will I just end up-with half-assed educations in three topics, but be a master of none of them?
  3. I fear that the degree name itself, Digital Multimedia Design, on my resume will lend itself to “Oh, she’s a graphic/web designer? Why the fuck is she applying for this public relations/copywriting/etc job?” types of situations.giphy18
  4. From what I understand, the world basically now has more graphic designers than it has good jobs to offer them. Obviously, that’s a big concern. Billie gotsa get PAID. Graphic and/or Web Design is the closest I could ever get to having a STEM career, and they say that’s where the money is. But if there’s so many candidates and not enough jobs for them all, then I might as well just major in Liberal Arts or Alligator Wrestling or Underwater Basketweaving.
  5. Speaking of paid: Penn State is significantly more expensive than Southern New Hampshire University, which is currently my top choice for their online Communications/Professional Writing degree program. Over an estimated 3-ish years (hopefully less), we’re talking $19,800 versus $33,600. However, with that pricetag I get a school with a much higher level of recognition and respect. But is it worth that additional $14,000 or so, particularly given my advanced age? Do I really want to still be paying on student loan debts from my bed at the nursing home?
  6. I can’t help but notice that the curriculum involves a lot of group projects and collaborative assignments. And there’s that whole problem with… Well. You know. I kinda don’t much like people, especially working with them, especially where my grades are concerned. Sooooo.

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0

Adulthood Is A Bitch

Get comfortable, dear reader, because this is gonna be a lengthy one. Why, you ask? Because I think I might be scrapping the whole Clinical Mental Health Counselor career path.

 

I know, I know. I sound flaky as fuck right now. But but but reasons! I have them!

Basically, as I’ve mentioned on this blog before, I’ve never been 100% comfortable with the idea of having to go to grad school in order to make my Bachelors worth anything. If I complete my B.A./B.S. and then decide that I want to go to grad school at that point, that’s whole ‘nother story. But with my advanced age as I start out my undergraduate degree, I’ve just not been in love with the idea of feeling obligated to continue on to grad school. But I was willing to suck it up and just accept it as part of my academic path.

Now I’ve known all along that in order to obtain my licensure as an LPC (Licensed Professional Counselor), after grad school I would have to work for a couple of years as an Intern (or LPC-I), under direct supervision. Cool, sure, no worries. Right?

 

Yeah, about that.  What I learned this week is that supervision doesn’t come free. Well, let me back up… It theoretically can if after grad school you land a job interning with a agency who provides your supervision hours as part of your employment with them. It’s considered a perk of the job. However, those opportunities are fewer than you might think (especially in a small town like mine), and the ones that do exist are extremely competitive.

Because of these factors, most LPC-I’s have to find supervision in private practice, and that costs money. Big money. Like, $100-200 per week. For real, ya’ll. So let’s use some of my blossoming fancy math skills, shall we? Based on the median weekly amount of $150 per week, the equation looks something like this:

($150 x 52 weeks) 2 years = $15,600

 

Keep in mind this is AFTER grad school, so no more grants, no more loans, no financial aid at all. That cool 15 Grand+ would be coming completely out of my relatively empty, freshly-graduated pocket.

 

Can you actually hear my feet on the floor, backpedaling like a boss right now? (They’re pretty big feet, so I wouldn’t be surprised if you could.)

 

 

Needless to say, I’m feeling quite discouraged about the LPC career path now, and reevaluating all the choices I’ve made up to this point. Getting my Bachelor’s in Psychology isn’t going to lead me anywhere I want to be without having to follow it up with grad school and licensure, so I’ve been exploring other options.

The first and closest online equivalent I’ve found would be to get a Bachelor of Science in Human Services. It’s administered through the University of South Carolina, right here at the Beaufort campus. With it, I could go on to become a Substance Abuse Counselor. No grad school required, but I would still have to intern and do supervised hours for two years. However, from everything I’m reading, the opportunities for employment that provides your supervision are far more numerous. But would I enjoy it? Ehh. Maybe? I’m not sure. If I’m being completely honest, I just don’t feel quite so drawn to this field as I did Mental Health counseling.  And also because, well…

 

Another option from USC is one that I’ve mentioned before, the Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Studies, which is administered online through the main campus up in Columbia. I would probably enjoy the coursework for the major, as I could focus on Psychology, Sociology, and English courses. And at the end of 4-5 years, I would be able to say “Hey, look! I got me a Bachelor’s degree, ya’ll!” But on it’s own, it would be worth about as much as that Psychology degree that I’m reconsidering. Hrmph.

So that got me to thinking… What if I did get me a good old “useless” degree after all?  Instead of worrying about career paths and earning potential and adulting, what if I just majored in something I would enjoy? I mean, I have a decent job that I love. I’m already far beyond entry-level. And wasn’t the entire original point of me going back to college more personal than professional anyhow? To finish what I started 20 years ago?

Which leads me to…

 

 

Yeah… Writing.  Oh, come on, don’t look at me like that.  And really, I mean, if you’re reading and enjoying this blog right now, that idea hopefully doesn’t shock you. (Unless it does, and you’re only reading this blog right now to mock me to your co-workers, which I acknowledge is entirely possible.) After all, I mean, I did get that perfect score on the writing section of my placement exams. So maaaaybe there’s something to that worth exploring?

 

After some research, I’ve created a shortlist of schools that I would be interested in transferring to, all of which offer online Bachelor’s degrees in English with a concentration in Writing:

 

 

#3: University of Colorado (Denver Campus), Bachelor of Arts in English Writing
UC Denver is an extremely reputable school and is definitely a great option (hence why it made the list), but of the three, it has the most drawbacks for me. I don’t love that it’s all the way in Colorado should I need to visit the campus. Also, it’s coursework has slightly less focus on creative writing and more on technical writing, which is both good and bad: It would probably be better for employment opportunities, but also pretty boring. It’s also the most expensive of my current three choices, coming in at $467 per hour.

#2: Southern New Hampshire University, Bachelor of Arts in Creative Writing & English
Yes, the same SNHU that you see the commercials for. I hesitated on this one, as generally the majority of the mass-marketed online schools are just for-profit diploma mills. But I did a lot of research, and it turns out that SNHU is completely legit, and their online programs are very much geared towards online non-traditional students like myself. And at $320 per hour, it’s the most affordable.

 

#1: University of Central Florida, Bachelor of Arts in English: Creative Writing
This program seems to have the most of what I’m looking for: A creative Writing bachelor’s program that can be completed online, strong support for online students, an entire Transfer & Transition Services department that I can speak with while I’m at my community college these next two years to make sure I’m on the right track for an eventual transfer to UCF, prerequisites that I can actually complete at TCL, and a main campus located within a 5-hour driving distance from me. In fact, it’s a drive I’m extremely familiar with and make at least once a year anyhow. That’s right, ya’ll… UCF is located in Orlando. And as far as price goes, it’s only a little more than SNHU at $384 per credit hour.

As far as a minor goes, I probably should minor in something related to my major, like Technical Writing or Journalism.  Orrrrr I could just minor in something fun, right?  You know, like Anthropology!

 

I’m totally serious, James Franco.  I mean, for fuck’s sake, just look at the titles of the courses I would get to choose from!

  • ANT 3026: Mummies, Zombies, and Vampires: Anthropology of the Undead
  • ANT 3107: Blood and Valor in the Viking World
  • ANT 3177: Archaeology of Caribbean Piracy
  • ANT 3241: Magic, Ritual, and Belief
  • ANT 4013: Anthropology of Fast Food
I’m #sorrynotsorry, but that all sounds completely freakin’ AWESOME to me.

 

But anyhow.  All of that being said, if after completing my Bachelor’s I decide that I do want to continue on to grad school after all, I have an extremely convenient option. Savannah College of Art and Design, just an hour down the road from me, offers a fully-online Master of Fine Arts in Writing. So clearly, SCAD would be the obvious choice for my graduate degree.

 

 

So that’s kinda where things stand now. Or not stand, since they’re all up in the air. That’s where things float now? Whatever. More importantly, how on Earth is it even possible that I’m 36 years old and still don’t know what I want to be when I grow up?